Vampire-safe gazpacho

If you firmly believe that soups must be served hot, even when it’s ninety degrees out, you may want to read no further. This post is about cold soup, and the way it brings a hint of arctic chill to a hot day.

When traveling in Spain, I learned that gazpacho is like a Bible verse. It never means the same thing to any two people.

Some people think gazpacho should be juicy and light, royal red, and served in a glass goblet. Others think it should be more of a meal unto itself, fortified with cream, bread, eggs, and served in a deep heavy bowl.

I like a mostly whole foods gazpacho. On this occasion, my ingredients were almost all purchased from the Louisville, Kentucky Gray Street Farmer’s market. There I found some gorgeous tomatoes, sweet peppers, purple onions, and elephant garlic.

Proportions were as follows: 4 tomatoes, one small red bell pepper, one small onion, one clove elephant garlic, and 3/4 cup of Greek style yoghurt.

This recipe also calls for a tablespoon or so each of salt, cooking oil, and balsamic vinegar to taste.

First, I chopped the tomatoes, skins on.

Then I chopped and sauteed the onions and pepper in olive oil, just long enough for the onions to soften and bring out the flavors.

Everything got blended in the 1970s blender that I got at a thrift store eleven years ago. (Proof that planned obsolescence began in the eighties).

I use a 1970s blender that I got for free as part of a bundle purchase from a junk shop in 2008. Still works. You can use any kind of processor to make gazpacho, but I like the blender because I can pour from it directly and then stow the soup in the refrigerator without moving it to a new container.
I was a little heavy handed with the garlic, but the carnivore says, “At least we won’t have vampires. You could call this the vampire safe gazpacho.”

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